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The Ingredient We NEVER Thought to Add to Our Coffee

[fa icon="calendar"] Aug 10, 2016 10:00:00 AM / by Contributed

From free-range butter to cocoa and condensed milk to salt, it seems like you can put anything in coffee these days. However, I recently came across an ingredient that I couldn’t imagine dumping into my daily cup of coffee.

Eggs.

Gross, right?


I stumbled across Vietnamese Egg Coffee when planning my upcoming trip to Vietnam. It looks like a much more indulgent coffee dessert drink than a morning pick-me-up. I’ll definitely try it and report back, but still, the idea of putting a raw egg in my coffee is strange to me.


 

Vietnamese Egg coffee!!! Art of Cuisine. It came from Hanoi since 1940 by a old family tradition

A photo posted by Lap Nguyen (@eating_vietnam_culture) on


Upon additional research, Vietnam is not the only country that integrates their eggs and coffee.


Austria has its own version called Kaisermelange, which directly translates to “The Emperor’s Melange,” which is made up of strong black coffee, an egg yolk, and honey (a traditional melange is made up of a mix of frothed milk and steamed coffee).


 

Lovely kind of #breakfast ☀️ Thai-style spicy sweet basil bread of #amante 🍃 and #kaisermelange austria-style #coffee ☕️ yolk + honey + french pressed coffee 😉 เมื่อวานซื้อขนมปังจากร้านที่ bkk farmer market มาค่ะ เป็นรสผัดกระเพรา หอมใบกระเพรานิดๆ เลยชงกาแฟมากินคู่กัน วันก่อนเพิ่งเห็นสูตรนี้ เป็นกาแฟสไตล์ออสเตรียค่ะ ไข่แดง1ฟอง + น้ำผึ้ง (ฝนใส่18gหวานไป คราวหลังจะลดเหลือ10gดู) + กาแฟดำร้อน1ถ้วย (180ml) แปลกดี เหมือนกินกาแฟใส่นมข้นหวานแต่ไม่รู้สึกมันขนาดนั้นค่ะ กินแรกๆจะรู้สึกกลิ่นไข่หน่อยๆ แต่ไปๆมาๆก็อร่อยดีค่ะ ใครไม่กลัวที่จะต้องกินไข่ดิบลองดูนะคะ 😁 long time no #foodmorning ☀️

A photo posted by Breakfast Lover (@fonfunfitfood) on


Furthermore, there is Scandinavian Egg Coffee - also called Swedish Egg Coffee or Norwegian Egg Coffee - where coffee grounds are mixed with either egg shells to make a paste, and dropped into boiling water and strained.



There are several reasons why the addition of eggs to coffee can be beneficial.

 

Eggs are a great natural emulsifier - they are often used in recipes to bind ingredients that don’t naturally want to mix together (like in mayonnaise with vinegar and oil). When blended with coffee - and any other ingredients you may be adding in - eggs create a smooth and creamy treat.


Eggs are also extremely nutrient dense. Authority Nutrition states that out of your Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA), just one egg contains:

  • 22% of Selenium
  • 15% of Vitamin B2
  • 9% of Vitamin B12 and Phosphorus
  • 7% of Vitamin B5
  • 6% of Vitamin A
  • 5% of Folate

Eggs also contain helpful amounts of Vitamin D, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Vitamin B6, Calcium and Zinc. Along with all of these important vitamins and minerals, eating eggs increases your High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) aka your good cholesterol.


 

By adding full eggs or egg yolks to a cup of coffee, it transforms the antioxidant rich drink into a filling and healthy meal. Another good-for-you and substantial form of coffee is the CoffeeBar, for anyone who is still freaked out by the whole coffee-egg scenario or for any vegans out there.

 

Egg shells are mostly made of calcium carbonate, which is a basic salt. Mixing crushed egg shells with coffee grounds produces less acidic coffee because the basic egg shells balances out the acidic beans, resulting in a less bitter brew.

The shells also make the coffee grounds flocculate (clump together and sink) so serving the coffee is much easier.


Ready to try adding some egg to your coffee? Here are a few eggcellent recipes we found.


Vietnamese Egg Coffee, courtesy of & see full recipe at My Kitchen Affair:

  • Brewed Vietnamese coffee
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2 tsp sweetened condensed milk

 

Image courtesy of My Kitchen Affair.

Scandinavian Egg Coffee; courtesy of & see full recipe at I Need Coffee:

  • 1 fresh egg
  • 1 to 1 ½ tbs of your preferred coffee, coarsely ground (similar to what you would use for a french press)
  • 1 cup of water
  • 1 cup of ice cold water (yes, that’s a total of 2 cups of water)
  • Sugar and milk to taste
  • Saucepan

Image courtesy of INeedCoffee.com

Topics: coffee, recipes

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